A Parent’s Guide to Mr. Peabody and Sherman (Movie)

WARNING: Reading this article may give away things in the story ranging from unimportant to plot turners.

Mr. Peabody and Sherman by Rob Minkoff (Director)

Quality

Plot: 3/5 Average: The plot was not cliché, except at the end, but was definitely action packed and motivated by action. The story was mainly event after event after event, though the events did have some order. The characters did compensate for the slightly week plot in some ways. Mr. Peabody and Sherman were probably the most original characters. Other characters were usually more cliché and/or predictable.

Graphics: 3/5 Average: The graphics were plain. There was no special detail to them, such as lighting or detail, but it was not unpleasant to watch either.

Moral: 1/5 A Mostly Negative Moral: The moral mainly revolved of child independence and a journey from submission to rebellion, glossing it over at the end with a makeup scene, but overall not really teaching children to be obedient. Sherman has always trusted and obeyed his dad, but upon going to school and being made fun of, he starts to slowly become more and more rebellious. He is at first hesitant, but from the peer pressure from Penny, a girl that mocked him at school, he ignores his dad, eventually reaching the point when he rebels against his father with no prompting. He uses excuses such as “All my friends are doing it,” and though things do fall apart and Mr. Peabody has to help his son, there is little emphasis on parental protection as there is on rebellion. A parent may see the makeup, but the child is much more likely to see the rebellious attitude. The only positive moral that could be seen is that there Mr. Peabody and Sherman do care for each other, and Mr. Peabody loves Sherman to the point of doing anything for him. Again though, this moral is inferior to the attitudes of the children against their authority.

Overall: 3/5 Below Average: There is much better out there that can be watched in graphics and story, and the moral is negataive. Because of that, when considering quality, I would say that this movie is not really high up on the recommendation list. One would probably be better off watching the original series or another cartoon or time travel movie.

Moral Content

Official Rating: PG

Sexual and Inappropriate Content: 2/5 Crude Humor and Suggestive Content: A boy points out how King Tut’s “name rhymes with butt.” He laughs when his dad says “booby trap,” and says its because of what his dad said. His dad gives him a disapproving look. Things pop out of statue’s butts. A man’s pants fall down. A man looks at a pair of underwear and holds it up to himself. A woman smacks her bottom and says she tired of sitting on her “abbondanza,” which a boy says “probably” doesn’t “mean chair.” (It means “abundance.”) Some of the dresses on a few women are low. One painting shows a woman with a large, mostly bare bosom. There is another brief abstract painting in the background of a giant creature that does not have clothes, but does not have any details besides the basic limbs and hands and feet. There are a few shirtless characters. A baby’s diaper briefly falls off from the back. A boy and a girl share a long hug once. A newly married couple kisses once. An invention mentioned and demonstrated by a dog is tear away pants. A dog refuses to sniff another dogs butt.

Violence: 2/5 Some Cartoon Violence: A boy is mentioned in speech to have bitten a girl. Later, a dog bites a woman, though the act is not shown. A dog bites someone’s leg for humor purposes. A girl slaps a boy’s sandwich out of his and holds him by the neck. A dog’s head is almost chopped off, but it isn’t. Characters throw fruit at other characters. There are a few sword fights and brief battles. Swords and spears are aimed and thrown at things and characters. A brick is thrown through a window. A character gets tasered twice.

Swearing and Using the Lord’s Name in Vain: ½/5 Slight Misuse: “Gosh” is said once. “Jeez” is said once.

Emotional, Intense, and Disturbing Content: 2/5 Some Lightly Disturbing Content: Mr. Peabody and Sherman are repeatedly threatened throughout the movie. There are several crashes, and things get destroyed or catch fire a couple of times. There are a few explosions once. A girl bullies a boy once. A boy asks a girl if he should kill some people though skinning and fire ant torture. He doesn’t. A girl is nearly forced to be stabbed and to take a blood oath, but she isn’t. A statue breathes out fire. People are threatened to be plagued if they do not release a girl, though the person threatening really can’t plague them. There is a picture of a heart being torn out of a women’s body. It is then explained in speech that in Egypt, that a pharaoh’s wife was gutted and mummified when her husband was. A boy thinks his dad has died, but he hasn’t. A boy cries once. There is a potentially disturbing child machine that is described as “creepy.” A boy holds a hand that turns out to be a mummy’s hand. One of the time eras that they end up in is the Trojan War. There are soldiers, fighting, and characters chant “blood!” repeatedly. Bite marks are shown on character’s arms. A character gets zapped by lightning. A boy trips and falls on his face a few times. A character has back pain. Characters faint twice. Water overflows and washes over some characters. Characters get hit in the head or things fall on them, though don’t crush or kill them.

Religious Issues: 2/5 Some Brief Mention: There is mention of certain false gods by name. A character pretends to be a false god once to trick people. A character briefly mentions the Egyptian belief about what happens after death. Characters bow when they see the time machine. A character hypnotizes some other characters. Briefly, a boy and girl fly into a Catholic church that has a priest and a choir. The Minotaur and Achilles are mentioned.

Magic: 0/5 None

Others: Some people are served alcoholic drinks at a kitchen bar. Rock and roll music with drums is played a couple of times. There is once pop music. Some characters dance a few times. A character does yoga once. Sigmund Freud is mentioned once in speech.

Overall: 2/5 Child Appropriate: Though not one of the most recommended movies morally, mainly for jokes about body parts and mentions of false gods, I believe the minimum appropriate age for this movie would be ten and older, outside of my thoughts about the overall moral.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s